LogoLogo

Cloze Text - Lady Chatterley's Lover - D.H. Lawrence

Lady Chatterley's LoverThe text is a synopsis of Lady Chatterley's Lover, by David Herbert Lawrence, a novel that in 1929 shocked the public for its treatment of sexuality.
Instructions: Make a choice by clicking on the *Select* button, then click "Show Solutions" to see the correct answer. If you want to read the text first, make the "Solutions" visible.

Study the Words to insert:

Section One
against= contro -- becomes= diventa -- cottage= baita -- divided= diviso/a -- god= dio -- laws= leggi -- surrounds= circonda -- story= storia -- symbol= simbolo -- thought= pensiero -- word= parola

Section Two
affair= relazione -- gamekeeper= guardacaccia -- have been= sono stati/e -- invalid= invalido -- looks= sembra -- novel= romanzo -- refuge= rifugio -- solitude= solitudine -- surface= superficie -- true= vero/a -- wood= bosco -- wound= ferita

Section Three
according= secondo -- become= diventare -- breakdown= crollo -- conquest= conquista -- core= nucleo -- divorce= divorzio -- husband= marito -- nature= natura -- pregnant= incinta -- realize= comprendono -- third= terzo/a -- to have= avere
Follow Eamus on Facebook:

Section One

The novel takes place at Wragby Hall, the mansion of the negative Sir Clifford Chatterley, the of sterility, abstract , authoritarianism; in this mansion life is a "squalid existence", an "empty mechanism", in a , death. Life, liberty, physicality, the flow of natural have their true place in the park that Wragby Hall; in the park there is the small of the gamekeeper, who is like the priest of a pastoral religion, the of fertility. As the develops, the park a second Eden, where the two lovers become Adam and Eve the laws of the malignant God Sir Clifford. The story can be into three great parts.

Section Two

In the first part, which goes until the tenth chapter, we learn about Wragby Hall, its inhabitants, the park and the , until Mrs Bolton arrives to care after the Sir Clifford and Constance Chatterley meets Oliver Mellors, the gamekeeper, in the . In this section we also learn about the "prehistory" of the : Sir Clifford became an invalid in consequence of a war , Constance had an intellectual education and, after her husband's mutilation, had an unsatisfactory love with a young playwright, Michaelis, but without establishing a physical communion. After a year's in the destructive company of her husband, Constance is growing thinner and sick: all living emotions and feelings suppressed in her. She finds a in the park, where she slowly, during her solitary walks, begins to rediscover the germs of life: her identity gradually comes to the again as she abandons herself to the natural cycles of animals and plants.

Section Three

The second part, from the 11th to the 14th chapter, is the of the novel: in her physical union with Mellors, Constance can finally one with nature, but this leads to the of her marriage. In this section the two lovers that they have to leave their Eden, the park of Wragby Hall: Constance is , and they do not want the child Sir Clifford's name. So in the end we find them both waiting for a because they want to live their union openly, also to the laws of society. So from the "lover" of Lady Chatterley, Oliver Mellors will become her : class divisions are broken down, their of physical communion with each other and with will find expression in a new, true marriage.
[ Show Solutions ] ---- [ Hide Solutions ]
Section One
The novel takes place at Wragby Hall, the mansion of the negative Sir Clifford Chatterley, the symbol of sterility, abstract thought, authoritarianism; in this mansion life is a "squalid existence", an "empty mechanism", in a word, death. Life, liberty, physicality, the flow of natural laws have their true place in the park that surrounds Wragby Hall; in the park there is the small cottage of the gamekeeper, who is like the priest of a pastoral religion, the god of fertility. As the story develops, the park becomes a second Eden, where the two lovers become Adam and Eve against the laws of the malignant God Sir Clifford. The story can be divided into three great parts.

Section Two
In the first part, which goes until the tenth chapter, we learn about Wragby Hall, its inhabitants, the park and the gamekeeper, until Mrs Bolton arrives to care after the invalid Sir Clifford and Constance Chatterley meets Oliver Mellors, the gamekeeper, in the wood. In this section we also learn about the "prehistory" of the novel: Sir Clifford became an invalid in consequence of a war wound, Constance had an intellectual education and, after her husband's mutilation, had an unsatisfactory love affair with a young playwright, Michaelis, but without establishing a true physical communion.

After a year's solitude in the destructive company of her husband, Constance is growing thinner and looks sick: all living emotions and feelings have been suppressed in her. She finds a refuge in the park, where she slowly, during her solitary walks, begins to rediscover the germs of life: her identity gradually comes to the surface again as she abandons herself to the natural cycles of animals and plants.

Section Three
The second part, from the 11th to the 14th chapter, is the core of the novel: in her physical union with Mellors, Constance can finally become one with nature, but this leads to the breakdown of her marriage. In the third section the two lovers realize that they have to leave their Eden, the park of Wragby Hall: Constance is pregnant, and they do not want the child to have Sir Clifford's name. So in the end we find them both waiting for a divorce because they want to live their union openly, also according to the laws of society. So from the "lover" of Lady Chatterley, Oliver Mellors will become her husband: class divisions are broken down, their conquest of physical communion with each other and with nature will find expression in a new, true marriage.