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Gulliver's Travels, by Jonathan Swift - comprehension exercise

Gulliver's Travels, by Jonathan SwiftThe text is a synopsis from Wikipedia of Gulliver's Travels, by Jonathan Swift, especially prepared to maximize learning of English lexicon and structure.
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Study the Words to insert:

among= tra -- apprentice= apprendista -- approaches= si avvicina -- avoids= evita -- awakes= si sveglia -- became= divenne -- becomes= diventa -- beings= esseri -- blinded= accecato -- buys= compra -- called= chiamata -- captain= capitano -- charged= accusato -- claims= dichiara -- clergyman= uomo di chiesa -- concern= interesse -- conclusion= conclusione -- course= rotta -- court= corte -- crew= equipaggio -- depth= profondità -- despising= disprezzando -- despite= nonostante -- drops= lascia cadere -- dystopian= distopico -- endowed= dotato -- escapes= fugge -- estate= tenuta -- expelled= espulso -- explore= esplorano -- forerunner= precursore -- found= trovato -- ghosts= fantasmi -- hardens= si irrigidisce -- inquiry= indagine -- Irish= irlandese -- kingdom= regno -- last= durano -- leaving= lasciando -- left= partì -- linked= collegato -- magician= mago -- malignant= perverse -- marooned= abbandonato -- money= denaro -- narrator= narratore -- nightmarish= da incubo -- old age= vecchiaia -- optimist= ottimista -- outlined= espose -- picked up= raccolto -- point= obiettivo -- projection= proiezione -- pursuit= ricerca -- races= razze -- refuses= rifiuta -- rejects= rifiuta -- rescued= salvato -- resembles= somiglia -- rest= resto -- returns= torna -- rival= rivali -- ruin= rovina -- satire= satira -- section= sezione -- seized= afferrato -- sets out= crea -- setting= sfondo -- ship= nave -- size= taglia -- squalor= squallore -- stables= stalle -- subdue= sottomettere -- surgeon= chirurgo -- surprised= sorpreso -- tall= alti -- threat= minaccia -- treats= tratta -- unable= incapace -- warning= avvertimento -- which= cui -- whom= che -- wise= saggio -- young= giovani
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Gulliver's Travels, published in 1726, is a novel in four parts written by the author Jonathan Swift; it immediately popular and is recognized as a classic of English literature.

The protagonist and is Lemuel Gulliver, who, according to the novel, was born in Nottinghamshire, where his father had a small , about 1661. He studied for three years at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, leaving to become an to an eminent London ; after four years, he to study at the University of Leiden, a prominent French medical school. He also educated himself in navigation and mathematics, the University around 1685.

Gulliver's travels from 1699 to 1715, having changed Gulliver's personality to that of a recluse. He to have written his memoirs five years following his last return to England, that is in 1720 or 1721.

The earliest editions of the book credited Gulliver as the author, many believed to be a real person, since Swift, an Anglican , published much of his work anonymously or pseudonymously.

In the first part, "A Voyage to Lilliput", after a shipwreck Gulliver to find himself a prisoner of a race of people one-twelfth the of normal human beings (6 inches tall), who are inhabitants of the two countries of Lilliput and Blefuscu. He is given a residence in Lilliput and becomes a favourite at . Gulliver assists the Lilliputians to their neighbors but he to reduce the country to a province of Lilliput, displeasing the King and the court; therefore he is with treason and sentenced to be . With the assistance of a friend, Gulliver , finds an abandoned boat and sails out to be by a passing ship which takes him back to England.

In the second part of the novel, "A Voyage to Brobdingnag", Gulliver's ship is steered off by storms, he is abandoned by his companions and by a farmer of Brobdingnag, where people are 72 feet . The farmer brings Gulliver home and his daughter looks after him. The farmer him as a curiosity and exhibits him for .

Also the Queen of Brobdingnag wants to see the show, she Gulliver and keeps him as a favourite at court. The queen commissions a small house, a "travelling box", for Gulliver to carry him around. On a trip to the seaside, his "travelling box" is by a giant eagle which Gulliver and his box right into the sea where he is by some sailors, who return him to England.

In the third part, "A Voyage to Laputa, Glubbdubdrib, and Japan", after Gulliver's is attacked by pirates, he is near a desolate island. There he is rescued by the flying island of Laputa, a devoted to the arts of music and mathematics, but to use them for practical ends. He tours the country and sees the brought about by the of science without practical results.

Then Gulliver takes a short trip to the island of Glubbdubdrib, where he visits a and discusses history with the of historical figures. He also encounters the Struldbrugs, who are immortal, but not forever ; they are rather forever old, with all the infirmities of . After reaching Japan, Gulliver returns home, determined to stay there for the of his days.

In the Fourth Part, "A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnhnms", his intention of remaining at home, Gulliver returns to sea as the of a merchant ship. His mutiny and leave him on the first island they meet.

Here there are two : the deformed creatures, called "Yahoos", similar to human , and the intelligent horses, the "Houyhnhnms", who are the dominant race. Gulliver a member of a horse's household, and admires the horses and their lifestyle, the humans. However, an Assembly of the Horses decides that Gulliver, a Yahoo with reason, is a danger to their civilization and he is .

He is then rescued by a Portuguese ship, and is to see that Captain Pedro de Mendez, a Yahoo, is a and generous person. He to his home in England, but he is unable to live the humans; he becomes a recluse, his family and his wife, and spends several hours a day speaking with the horses in his .

Gulliver's Travels has been called a , a children's story, a Science Fiction book, a of the modern novel. Despite the of the book, it is often classified as a children's story because of the popularity of the Lilliput as a book for children.

The book is a satirical view of European governments, of differences between religions, and an into whether men are inherently corrupt or whether they become corrupted. Gulliver's misadventures become more as time goes on and his attitude as the book progresses. In the first part he is surprised by the viciousness of the Lilliputians, then in the fourth part he the whole human race. Therefore the character of Gulliver progresses from a cheery at the start of the first part to a misanthrope of the book's .

Gulliver's Travels is sometimes with utopian and dystopian literature, because it shares a with ideas about good and bad societies. Among the countries that Lemuel Gulliver visits, only the Country of the intelligent Horses a utopia; most of the others have significant aspects.

The word utopia was first used by Sir Thomas More in his work "Utopia", published in 1516. The word utopia means "no place" in Greek, and also the Greek term for "good place". In his book, which was written in Latin, More a vision of an ideal society. As the title suggests, the work presents an ambiguous and ironical of the ideal state. An earlier example of a Utopian work from classical antiquity was Plato's "The Republic", in the Greek philosopher what he saw as the ideal society and its political system.

On the other hand, a Dystopia can be defined as a society characterised by poverty, , or oppression. Dystopias usually extrapolate elements of contemporary society as a against some modern trend, often the of oppressive regimes in one form or another. The main of a dystopia is to make people think about the world in which they live.
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Gulliver's Travels, published in 1726, is a novel in four parts written by the Irish author Jonathan Swift; it became immediately popular and is recognized as a classic of English literature.

The protagonist and narrator is Lemuel Gulliver, who, according to the novel, was born in Nottinghamshire, where his father had a small estate, about 1661. He studied for three years at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, leaving to become an apprentice to an eminent London surgeon; after four years, he left to study at the University of Leiden, a prominent French medical school. He also educated himself in navigation and mathematics, leaving the University around 1685.

Gulliver's travels last from 1699 to 1715, having changed Gulliver's personality to that of a recluse. He claims to have written his memoirs five years following his last return to England, that is in 1720 or 1721.

The earliest editions of the book credited Gulliver as the author, whom many believed to be a real person, since Swift, an Anglican clergyman, published much of his work anonymously or pseudonymously.

In the first part, "A Voyage to Lilliput", after a shipwreck Gulliver awakes to find himself a prisoner of a race of people one-twelfth the size of normal human beings (6 inches tall), who are inhabitants of the two rival countries of Lilliput and Blefuscu. He is given a residence in Lilliput and becomes a favourite at court. Gulliver assists the Lilliputians to subdue their neighbors but he refuses to reduce the country to a province of Lilliput, displeasing the King and the court; therefore he is charged with treason and sentenced to be blinded. With the assistance of a friend, Gulliver escapes, finds an abandoned boat and sails out to be rescued by a passing ship which takes him back to England.

In the second part of the novel, "A Voyage to Brobdingnag", Gulliver's ship is steered off course by storms, he is abandoned by his companions and found by a farmer of Brobdingnag, where people are 72 feet tall. The farmer brings Gulliver home and his daughter looks after him. The farmer treats him as a curiosity and exhibits him for money.

Also the Queen of Brobdingnag wants to see the show, she buys Gulliver and keeps him as a favourite at court. The queen commissions a small house, called a "travelling box", for Gulliver to carry him around. On a trip to the seaside, his "travelling box" is seized by a giant eagle which drops Gulliver and his box right into the sea where he is picked up by some sailors, who return him to England.

In the third part, "A Voyage to Laputa, Glubbdubdrib, and Japan", after Gulliver's ship is attacked by pirates, he is marooned near a desolate island. There he is rescued by the flying island of Laputa, a kingdom devoted to the arts of music and mathematics, but unable to use them for practical ends. He tours the country and sees the ruin brought about by the pursuit of science without practical results.

Then Gulliver takes a short trip to the island of Glubbdubdrib, where he visits a magician and discusses history with the ghosts of historical figures. He also encounters the Struldbrugs, who are immortal, but not forever young; they are rather forever old, with all the infirmities of old age. After reaching Japan, Gulliver returns home, determined to stay there for the rest of his days.

In the Fourth Part, "A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnhnms", despite his intention of remaining at home, Gulliver returns to sea as the captain of a merchant ship. His crew mutiny and leave him on the first island they meet.

Here there are two races: the deformed creatures, called "Yahoos", similar to human beings, and the intelligent horses, the "Houyhnhnms", who are the dominant race. Gulliver becomes a member of a horse's household, and admires the horses and their lifestyle, despising the humans. However, an Assembly of the Horses decides that Gulliver, a Yahoo endowed with reason, is a danger to their civilization and he is expelled.

He is then rescued by a Portuguese ship, and is surprised to see that Captain Pedro de Mendez, a Yahoo, is a wise and generous person. He returns to his home in England, but he is unable to live among the humans; he becomes a recluse, avoids his family and his wife, and spends several hours a day speaking with the horses in his stables.

Gulliver's Travels has been called a satire, a children's story, a Science Fiction book, a forerunner of the modern novel. Despite the depth of the book, it is often classified as a children's story because of the popularity of the Lilliput section as a book for children.

The book is a satirical view of European governments, of differences between religions, and an inquiry into whether men are inherently corrupt or whether they become corrupted. Gulliver's misadventures become more malignant as time goes on and his attitude hardens as the book progresses. In the first part he is surprised by the viciousness of the Lilliputians, then in the fourth part he rejects the whole human race. Therefore the character of Gulliver progresses from a cheery optimist at the start of the first part to a misanthrope of the book's conclusion.

Gulliver's Travels is sometimes linked with utopian and dystopian literature, because it shares a concern with ideas about good and bad societies. Among the countries that Lemuel Gulliver visits, only the Country of the intelligent Horses approaches a utopia; most of the others have significant dystopian aspects.

Utopias and the dystopia are genres of literature that explore social and political structures. Utopian fiction is the creation of an ideal world as the setting for a novel. Dystopian fiction is the opposite: the creation of a nightmarish world. Both utopias and dystopias are commonly found in science fiction.

The word utopia was first used by Sir Thomas More in his work "Utopia", published in 1516. The word utopia means "no place" in Greek, and resembles also the Greek term for "good place". In his book, which was written in Latin, More sets out a vision of an ideal society. As the title suggests, the work presents an ambiguous and ironical projection of the ideal state. An earlier example of a Utopian work from classical antiquity was Plato's "The Republic", in which the Greek philosopher outlined what he saw as the ideal society and its political system.

On the other hand, a Dystopia can be defined as a society characterised by poverty, squalor, or oppression. Dystopias usually extrapolate elements of contemporary society as a warning against some modern trend, often the threat of oppressive regimes in one form or another. The main point of a dystopia is to make people think about the world in which they live.